Tag Archives: drinking alcohol

Drinking while grocery shopping. Is pot next?

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Where did my grocery cart disappear to?

Amazon.com seems to be unstoppable. It’s grabbed the lion’s share of the e-commerce market, turned other retailers into mere showrooms for shoppers who then purchase online, discarded list prices in favor of its own internal comparisons, and turned Prime Day into a new national shopping holiday. Little buttons around the house can be pressed to reorder staples, and voice commands to my Amazon Echo can summon goods to the home.

Supermarkets are now in Amazon’s sights. I’ve received come-ons lately for Amazon Fresh.

But instead of quaking in their boots, some supermarkets are taking a page from the casino playbook and offering inexpensive alcoholic beverages to customers. From the Wall Street Journal (Supermarkets Invite Shoppers to Drink While They Shop):

At nearly 350 Whole Foods locations nationwide, shoppers can carry open beverages out of the bar area and around the store as they shop around. Some stores have added cup holders to their shopping carts or placed racks around the store where shoppers can place empty stemless wine glasses. In some Texas locations, the $1 cans of beer rest in ice-filled buckets labeled “walkin’ around beer.” “When customers find out that they can sip and shop, a lot of times it’s a lightbulb moment,” Mr. Kopperud says.

Take that Jeff Bezos!

As just about everyone knows, alcohol lowers inhibitions and is more or less guaranteed to boost retail sales. Impulse purchase anyone?

But let’s fast forward this story just a bit. With the movement toward the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes –which I oppose– it’s just a matter of time before these same stores start opening marijuana boutiques at their entrances, featuring a wide variety of tasty edibles. For Whole Foods they will likely be organic, gluten free and artisanal.

You can bet the munchies will contribute to a healthy boost to the average sale!

Come to think of it, these two ideas aren’t mutually exclusive. A walkin’ around beer and a marijuana edible sounds pretty darn attractive.

Ok, Amazon. What’s your reply?

Image courtesy of iosphere at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.

E-cigarettes: the California Cooler of the 21st century

Just a harmless, tasty treat?

Just a harmless, tasty treat?

If like me you came of age in the 1980s you remember the California Cooler, a sweet wine/juice combo that made it easy for kids to start drinking alcohol even if they couldn’t handle the “adult” taste of beer, wine or liquor. They were very popular at the time but I don’t recall anyone ever saying they were a healthy alternative to anything.

Fast forward 30 years to the e-cigarette era. New data show 13 percent of high school students use e-cigarettes. From the Boston Globe (E-cigarette use spikes among American teens)

In interviews, teenagers said that e-cigarettes had become almost as common at school as laptops, a change from several years ago, when few had seen the gadgets… A significant share said they were using the devices to quit smoking cigarettes or marijuana, while others said they had never smoked but liked being part of the trend and enjoyed the taste — two favorite flavors were Sweet Tart and Unicorn Puke, which one student described as “every flavor Skittle compressed into one.”

Policymakers are confused. E-cigarettes seem safer than smoking, and at least some people must be using them to try to quit. But my view is that at least for kids they lower the barriers to unhealthy behaviors by making drug use more like having a candy or soft drink. The FDA banned nicotine lollipops. Why is this different?

I’m concerned about this delivery method for nicotine, but I’m also worried about marijuana. E-cig entrepreneurs have been busy finding ways to use the devices to deliver THC, and there is a big rise in marijuana laced foods, so-called edibles or medibles. Let’s not fool ourselves and our kids by pretending these drugs are harmless treats.

Image courtesy of patrisyu at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By healthcare business consultant David E. Williams, president of Health Business Group.